Paris MoU Structural Safety and Load Lines CIC Report 2011

The CIC was held between September and November 2011 and the report was approved by the 45th meeting of the Port State Control Committee in May 2012. The results of the CIC will also be submitted to the next meeting of the IMO Sub-Committee on Flag State Implementation.

In 4386 inspections carried out by the Paris MoU from the 1st of September to the 30th of November of 2011 on 4250 individual ships, a CIC questionnaire was recorded. 963 inspections (22% of the total number of CIC inspections) resulted in deficiencies related to the topic of the campaign. A total of 150 detentions (3,4%) were recorded during the CIC, of which 42 (1,0%) were due to deficiencies directly related to the CIC topic.

The most frequently observed CIC related deficiencies have been:

  1. 03103 – Freeboard marks (in 172 inspections),
  2. 03108 – Ventilators, air pipes, casings (in 108 inspections),
  3. 02103 – Stability/strength/loading information and instruments (in 98 inspections),
  4. 09227 – Ropes and wires (in 87 inspections) and
  5. 02107 – Ballast, fuel and other tanks (in 70 inspections)

The CIC related deficiencies which have been considered as ground for detention with higher frequency have been:

  1. 02107 – Ballast, fuel and other tanks (in 7 inspections),
  2. 02103 – Stability/strength/loading information and instruments and
  3. 03108 – Ventilators, air pipes, casings (in 6 inspections each),
  4. 02106 – Hull damage impairing seaworthiness (in 5 inspections) and
  5. 03102 – Freeboard marks and
  6. 03109 – Machinery space openings (in 4 inspections each).

The number of deficiencies directly related to the CIC topic was 1589, accounting for 13% of the total number of deficiencies recorded in all inspections carried out by the Paris MoU during the three months of the campaign.

The general cargo/multipurpose ships were the most inspected type, with 1563 inspections (36% of total), followed by:

  1. bulk carr¡ers with 795 inspections (18%),
  2. container carriers with 493 inspections (11%) and
  3. chemical tankers with 433 inspections (10%).

As far as CIC related detentions are concerned, general cargo/multipurpose ships account for 24 detentions, followed by bulk carriers with 5 detentions, while the highest detention index (CIC related detentions as % of inspections) corresponds to passenger ships (4,2%), followed by offshore supply vessels with 2,8% and refrigerated cargo ships with 1,8%.

The ships flying the flags of Panama with 493 inspections (11%), Malta with 387 (9%), Antigua and Barbuda with 343 (8%) and Liberia with 306 (7%) were the most inspected, while the highest detention rates affects ships flying the flags of Panama with 7 detentions (17%), Saint Vincent and the Grenadines with 6 (14%) and Turkey with 3 detentions (7%).

The RO responsible for the highest number of detentions with CIC related deficiencies is International Naval Surveys Bureau (INSB), with 2 detentions, out of a total of 11 detentions in which the RO’s were considered to be responsible for having issued the certificates covering the CIC related detainable deficiencies.

The detailed report can be found HERE.

Source: Paris MoU

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